Wetland Biodiversity Matters, World Wetlands Day 2020

By Dr. Jen Karberg, Research Program Supervisor Last Saturday was World Wetlands Day – a day designed to celebrate the beauty, ecology, value and uniqueness of wetlands around the world. These days, it’s no argument how important wetlands are from marshes that provide homes for ducks and fish to raingardens in splendid summer flower capturing…

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Update on the Hither Creek Washover, Erosion and Salt Marshes

Salt marshes and shrub wetlands buried under the eroded sand dune at Hither Creek will likely never regenerate but new vegetation is recolonizing on top of the bare sand. Horseshoe crabs, piping plovers and even a state-listed plant are making there homes in the new habitat around Millie’s Pond.

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The Winter Life of the Salt Marsh

*Please note, this blog post was originally published in The Inquirer and Mirror on January 19, 2017  in the article series called Island Ecology. The Foundation’s Science staff will be regularly contributing to our local newspaper and reprinting articles here the following week.* As the shortest day of the year has passed and we officially…

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World Wetlands Day 2016

February 2nd is World Wetlands Day, celebrated internationally every year since 1997 to commemorate the signing of the Convention on Wetlands in Ramsar, Iran. The Ramsar Convention represents a multi-national treaty which has facilitated work to survey, study, prioritize and conserve valuable wetland resources around the world and to promote the wise use of wetlands. World Wetlands…

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Salt Marsh Dieback and the Purple Marsh Crab on Nantucket

Unexplained die off of salt marsh plants, particularly along creek edges and the low tide line, has become an increasing issue along the New England coast since the 1990s. Along marsh creek banks and harbor edges, salt marsh plants (particularly salt marsh cordgrass or Spartina alterniflora) began disappearing, leaving behind large swaths of exposed soil, filled…

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Controlling Phragmites with Salinity

*This research was recently published in the journal Wetland Science and Practice. The full article is available here: PhragmitesGreenhouseWSP Among invasive, non-native wetland plants in North America, Common reed (Phragmites australis); commonly just called Phragmites is king; forming dense monocultures and crowding out native plants. A variety of this species is native to North America, but the non-native…

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Salt Marsh Construction at Medouie Creek

The Medouie Creek Wetland is a large wetland along the north side of Polpis Harbor on Nantucket Island.  This wetland was historically one large salt water marsh, directly connected to the harbor, getting daily tides washing over it.  Sometime in the 1930s, a dike was created to build a road, allowing people access to the…

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