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What’s in Your Pond?

June 14, 2019

The answer to that question might surprise you. Ponds are hotspots for insects, birds, amphibians, and reptiles. The combination of wildlife and ever-changing lush landscapes also attracts the human eye. We are fortunate on Nantucket; while sometimes we have “too much of a good thing” in terms of over-exuberant pond vegetation, most of our aquatic…

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Meet Our 2017 Seasonal Botany and Ecology Field Assistants!

June 30, 2017

Each summer, the Nantucket Conservation Foundation’s Science and Stewardship Department hires two seasonal Botany and Ecology Field Assistants to help us collect data on a variety of projects throughout the field season. This year, we are very lucky to have Jacob Erle and Scott Fuchs on our team! Jake and Scott will be helping us…

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Let the Field Season Begin……

May 11, 2017

Spring is the time of year when there just doesn’t seem to be enough hours in the work day for our Science and Stewardship Department’s full-time staff. There are winter writing projects that need to be wrapped up, early season field work to fit in when Nantucket’s fickle spring weather is cooperative, preparations to be…

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Garlic Mustard: Friend or Foe in the Battle Against Deer Ticks?

May 11, 2016

Recently I heard a provocative statement to the effect that “garlic mustard is Mother Nature’s way of getting rid of deer ticks.” Naturally I needed to find out more. Could this actually be true? After spending hundreds of hours working with field crews managing this plant by hand-pulling in Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, not to mention here on Nantucket,…

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Controlling Phragmites with Salinity

March 20, 2015

*This research was recently published in the journal Wetland Science and Practice. The full article is available here: PhragmitesGreenhouseWSP Among invasive, non-native wetland plants in North America, Common reed (Phragmites australis); commonly just called Phragmites is king; forming dense monocultures and crowding out native plants. A variety of this species is native to North America, but the non-native…

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The Weed Wars: Nantucket Skirmishes with Invasive Plants

April 16, 2014

As spring finally warms up on Nantucket, you’ll begin to notice some of the shrubs greening up long before anything else. This is a good way to spot invasive non-native weeds in the landscape, such as Morrow’s bush honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii), autumn olive (Elaeagnus umbellata), and multiflora rose (Rosa multiflora). One of the classic definitions of a…

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Wild Cats on Nantucket!

February 22, 2013

There are few issues in wildlife biology that are as contentious and emotional as that of feral cats. It’s akin to modern politics, it seems that you are on one side or the other and there is no in between. For instance, the front cover of a recent issue of the Wildlife Professional produced by…

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Mute Swans (Cygnus olor)

January 16, 2013

  The mute swan is the largest waterfowl species found on Nantucket but is actually not a native species to the United States. Valued for its beauty and aesthetic appeal, it was brought here from its native Eurasia and was introduced to parks, zoos and private estates in the New York area during the late…

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Nantucket Students Learn About Island Invasive Plants

January 7, 2013

Environmental Science students at Nantucket High School (NHS) have been studying the ecological impacts of non-native invasive species around the world. Just before the holidays, Research Technician/Field Supervisor Kelly Omand, a member of NCF’s year-round Science and Stewardship staff, visited the NHS Environmental Science classes. Their teacher, Mr. Hanlon, had already provided a variety of background…

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Nantucket’s Most Wanted Turtles!

November 8, 2012

As implied in the first line of our last post, there are also at least two species of turtles that call Nantucket home that are not native to the island. Non-native species are those that are not naturally part of a local biota and these turtles were either intentionally released here or are escaped pets.…

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